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2005.07.29
Matthew McClintock

The Hound of the Baskervilles

One of the things I've always enjoyed about Sherlock Holmes stories is that while they're far-fetched they're not impossible, and that makes them more enjoyable. They're also really well suited to reading aloud, with excellent dialog.

2004.09.23
T. Paine

The Federalist Papers

Along with the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, The Federalist Papers laid the foundation for an enduring democracy in America. From 1787 to 1788, Hamilton, Madison, and Jay wrote this series of essays to advocate the ratification of the Constitution as a new charter of government. The brilliance of these men and the significance of the issues produced the most important work in political science ever written in the United States.

2004.09.23
Alexander Harms

Swann's Way

a very long read but a vary good one it took me several years to read all the set but it is a very good book.

2004.09.25
Wikipedia

Written in 1749 while Cleland was in debtor's prison in London, it is considered the first "erotic" novel and its publication caused a furor. Immediately upon its release, the Church of England asked the British Secretary of State to "stop the progress of this vile Book, which is an open insult upon Religion and good manners." As a result, Cleland was arrested and charged with "corrupting the King's subjects."

Nonetheless, copies of the book were sold "underground," and the book eventually made its way to the United States where, in 1821, it was banned for obscenity.

In 1963, G. B. Putnam published the book under the title John Cleland's Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure which also was immediately banned for obscenity. The publisher challenged the ban in court.

In a landmark decision in 1966, the United States Supreme Court ruled in Memoirs v. Massachusetts that the banned novel did not meet the Roth standard for obscenity.

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