Reviews by Bryan

The Blacksmith's Hammer, or The Peasant Code

by Eugne Se

A fantastic read; principles, virtue, vice, war, love, loss, duty, joy, honor, courage, kindness, forgiveness and redemption. All of these things set against the timeless struggle between rich and poor, and those of both classes who operate according to either timeless principle, or its guttural counterpart; fleeting, senseless materialism born of the belly for today. The story moves in those grand circles ordained by divine providence that continue to reunite the actors despite circumstance, time and distance. A grand weave of a tale that will not disappoint.

Reviewed on 2013.12.05

Star Dragon

by Mike Brotherton

An enjoyable story.

Good plot with interesting characters that don't always do what might be expected.

Reviewed on 2011.05.20

by

A good, quick read. It feels like a prelude to quite a bit more, though I haven't located any other works by this author.

You get: superheros (sort of), a scifi/fantasy convention (in snatches), a hardboiled detective type (though really he moonlights for a three letter agency), some sex (which is tastefully done and easily skipped if you must), and the foiling of a terrorist plot. All of it by thoroughly adult characters. Adult as in 'solid and mature', not as in XXX.

Reviewed on 2007.10.04

Halo

by Tom Maddox

This book felt like a first effort to me. The concept is intriguing, but the delivery seemed disjointed. Many times I found myself in long descriptive passages, wondering when the plot would advance ... or where the plot was, frankly. Then all of a sudden, in a few paragraphs, the plot would jerk forward with little explication. This would be followed by more lush descriptive passages which had little or nothing to do with moving the plot forward...

An example of the plot vagueness: several times we are reminded that Gonzales' memex (HeyMex) is in some way colluding with Aleph to do ... something. We never learn what. At one point HeyMex wishes it could talk with Gonzales, and goes to some effort to find him. But when they finally do meet, they exchange two sentences of dialog.

Another example: near then end, two characters fall in (love? lust?) and are married. But there is very little intercharacter development on which to base their sudden marriage.

I think there may be a good book in here, somewhere. But it needs more editorial and authorial work to bring it out.

Reviewed on 2007.08.20

more reviews ->