Reviews by H. E. Parmer

Binary

by Jay Caselberg

Although Binary is in the main quite well-written, there's one big problem with basing a science-fiction novel on one of the most well-known Shakespearian tragedies: Once the reader realizes the plot is lifted almost scene-for-scene from King Lear, there just aren't any big surprises. You know what's going to happen with the main characters, although the author fudges it a bit for one of them so the novel doesn't end on as bleak a note as the original play. Also, you can get away with some things in a Shakespearian drama that just don't work so well in a novel, particularly one that's trying for something more epic in its scope.

Reviewed on 2015.02.22

World of the Drone

by Robert Abernathy

Although the basic plot is nothing startling, the world this story constructs is well worth checking out. In a post-Apocalyptic wasteland, thousands of years after a nuclear war, humankind survives as scattered nomadic clans constantly at war with each other. What makes this story somewhat unique is the nomads' way of life: each clan builds its own specialized armed and armored vehicles patterned on some form of insect or arachnid, creating a sort of bizarre mechanized Road Warrior-ish bug pseudo-ecology with hints of the Plains Indians thrown into the mix. Existence is a dire, never-ending struggle between the clans for scarce resources, especially fuel and water. But will the clans recognize a new threat to them all in time to unite against it? Okay, this is 1950s-style pulp sf, so I think we all know the answer to that one, but it\'s still worth a read.

Reviewed on 2015.02.11

Unwise Child

by Gordon Randall Garrett

More interesting for its concepts than its characters (in fact, the most engaging personality in the story is the immature AI, Snookums). However, there are enough original ideas here to make it a worthwhile read.

Reviewed on 2013.10.25

When the Sleepers Woke

by Arthur Leo Zagat

Truly a nasty piece of work. If you enjoy pre-WWII pulp sf, you learn to expect a certain amount of casual racism and some occasional xenophobia, but this is the first time I've seen quite such a blatant two-fer of villainy: both a sinister Oriental and a brutal, gorilla-like African. And naturally, they both lust after the nubile young white woman. The story culminates in an act of genocide, leaving a devastated Earth to be re-populated by a handful of WASPs. Might have some interest for a student of post-apocalyptic literature, or of the darker side of the 1930s American psyche, otherwise, don't waste your time.

Reviewed on 2013.10.24

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