Reviews by Iridos

The Brain, A Decoded Enigma

by Dorin T. Moisa

Dorian,
I am sorry to see you have not understood my criticism. It seems quite plain and clear to me, so I am at a loss to why this is.

Also, you misunderstand the nature of my book-review. I did not expect or even ask for a reply from you, and I surely do not intend to use "MDT terminology" in my book-reviews. In short: a book-review is not written to chat with the author.

One more thing I want to point out: It was _you_ in exactly this book, who used the term 'elephant memory', which is ... how do you phrase it... "not defined in MDT".

I.

PS. feel free to read it again, though - it might be harsh criticism, but there's a lot of good and useful advice there between the lines for someone willing to see it.

Reviewed on 2008.12.04

Blindsight

by Peter Watts

Rather interesting book, but the end is quite a bit disappointing.

No idea why the author had to drag (genetically re-engineered) vampires out of the science fiction writers dirt box - it's not as if they were a necessity for the story.

I.

Reviewed on 2008.09.21

The Impossibles

by Gordon Randall Garrett

Not much to add to R Stephans comment - still the same humor, the story of Brain Twister continues, still worth reading (and only 200 pages as "large-font-PDF"). The novelty of the 1st book wears a bit off for me, so it was a bit less enjoyable.
Also we're regrettably getting deeper into the supernatural - perhaps "just telepathy" was not enough for an exciting story?

Different from the 1st book, there was (in my opinion) not so much of a mystery one could try to guess before being explicitly told.

Oh - one more thing - what happened to the blonde that our hero had madly fallen in love with in Brain Twister in this book?!

I.

Reviewed on 2008.09.20

Supermind

by Gordon Randall Garrett

This third book after BrainTwister (also under the name of "That Sweet Little Old Lady") and "The Impossibles" concludes the story around FBI agent Ken Malone, so better read the other two books first.

What happened to the brunette he had fallen in love with so madly in the second book?

We don't get told if the authors still blink/wait for marriage this time - another thing we'll now never know.

One funny thing throughout all the books: People always use "visaphones" - telephones with screens to see each other - which was perhaps not one of the most surprising projections of the future - but one that couldn't have been more wrong... we have mobiles all over now, and many of them have cameras, but still this is rarely used to show the partners of the conversation to each other :)

It's nice that the story has a twist and the end to the trilogy is quite unexpected, else it would have become quite a bit boring.

As science fiction goes, the whole series doesn't have great visions - the books are detective stories with telepathy and teleporting.

I.

Reviewed on 2008.09.20

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