Reviews by J.David Knepper

Common Sense

by Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine's bestseller from 1776 is just as appropriate today as it was before the founding of the Republic. Americans of that day were ill used by their Executive, exploited by their Legislature, and left unprotected by their Judiciary.

Common Sense had 500,000 copies in print in a time when only 1,500,000 people lived here. Paine words resonated in the hearts of a people who yearned for liberty, since he showed them the exact route to that goal.

America needs another Thomas Paine with the willingness to speak the truth to power.

Reviewed on 2010.09.20

The Scottish Chiefs

by Jane Porter

Jane Porter's classic on the life of Sir William Wallace tells the tale of Braveheart a little differently than the movie portrayal.

Deprived of the wife and unborn child of his youth, Wallace defended Scotland at a time when so-called high born folks were so interested in their own accumulation of wealth and power, that they would sacrifice their own country to a usurper.

Wallace was the hero of the age but at the hero of this book, a little too good to be believed.

Reviewed on 2010.09.20

That Printer of Udell's

by Harold Bell Wright

This little novel by Harold Bell Wright had a profound effect upon the life of the adolescent Ronald Reagan and served to form many of his basic beliefs in the Christian faith.

The noble hero, battered by unsympathetic and uncaring Christians, comes to Christ in spite of hypocritical followers of Christ.

As upbeat as many of the young peoples' novels of its day, and yet with a truly Christian worldview, this book led young Reagan to seek out baptism in his mother's church. Excellent read.

Reviewed on 2010.09.20

The Scarlet Letter

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Hawthorne's classic tale about the effects of unconfessed sin set in Puritan New England reminds us of basic truth.

The seemingly holy man was no better than the person cast out of polite society for committing sin. His adversary's power over him ended the moment he confessed his wrongdoing.

The outcast chose to return to the scene of her humiliation to serve out her life in service to others, showing the possibility of redemption for the worst of us. A surprisingly good book even if not required reading this time.

Reviewed on 2010.09.20

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