Reviews by Leah A. Zeldes

Proteus Island

by Stanley Grauman Weinbaum

Stanley G. Weinbaum was one of the best of the pre-Golden Age science-fiction writers, and his work remains eminently readable. In this story, a zoologist marooned on a mysterious island near New Zealand discovers that its flora and fauna are distinctly and dangerously odd. There's a bit of Jane meets Tarzan in it, and some unlikely science, but it's all very plausible and a fun, fast read.

Reviewed on 2014.03.23

The House of a Thousand Candles

by Meredith Nicholson

A fast-moving adventure. The plot may seem a bit predictable, but Nicholson packs in so much action that even when you expect what happens, the novel moves you right along.

The world-traveling scapegrace grandson of an eccentric architecture buff inherits his grandfather's partly finished Indiana house on condition he live there for a year and not marry the alternate heir who'll get the property if he fails to meet the conditions. On his first night in the house, somebody shoots at him. The house, it seems, is full of mysteries, and what happens next isn't quite what you expect.

Reviewed on 2014.03.15

Rosalind at Red Gate

by Meredith Nicholson

A sequel to "The House of a Thousand Candle" featuring Larry Donovan, who becomes entangled in the ugly family feud of a beautiful young woman, her father and her maiden aunt. It doesn't have quite the mystery or adventure of the earlier book but excellent characterization makes it a fun read.

Reviewed on 2014.03.15

Philo Gubb

by Ellis Parker Butler


Hilarious stories of Philo Gubb, Riverview, Iowa's greatest correspondence-school deteckative and wallpaper hanger. It might take you a couple of these stories to appreciate Gubb, and you won't want to read too many at a sitting, but these are very funny tales.

Reviewed on 2014.03.15

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