Reviews by Leo Kudrin

Three Men on the Bummel

by Jerome K. Jerome

A Bummel is a German word and it signifies a journey or just a stroll but not what you’ve thought about. The book ,as it seems, is not so famous as “Three Men in a Boat”, but it has it’s own merits, in my opinion, and also very readable. In my judgement the value of it lies at the historical plane because the book comprises an excellent description (with a bit of humor, of course) of Germany and the Germans of the end of the 19th. Century (apparently in the vicinity of 1895-1900). To read this book it’s like plunging in a Time Machine into that one atmosphere.

And mind you that “Three Men on the Bummel” appeared in 1900 that is 14 years before the beginning of the First World War.

By the way, I don’t think that the Germans have changed drasticly since than. The scenery-yes but not the people.

Reviewed on 2006.11.22

The Moonstone

by Wilkie Collins


On the one hand- beyond the borders of sensibility murderously tedious (just like a soap opera), on the other- extremely well written novel.

Reviewed on 2006.10.20

The Clue of the Twisted Candles

by Edgar Wallace

Good adventure novel wich containes a cunning villain, love, revenge and locked room murder. And good author too, E. Wallace is.

They say that in tha UK in the 1920s Edgar Wallace was the second biggest seller after the Bible.

And by the way, he wrote the scenario for King Kong movie (1933).

To my surprise I encountered on some blunders and mistakes in the novel. The most blatant one: The Browning automatic pistol (the weapon that killed Vassalaro ) called here as a revolver.

Reviewed on 2006.09.13

The Red House Mystery

by A.A. Milne


An excellent novel.It is interesting that it was the only detective novel that A.A.Milne ever wrote.

Reviewed on 2006.09.09

more reviews ->