Reviews by Monaggio

Zero-Option

by Lindsay Brambles

The author spends 1/3 of the story explaining how wonderful and awe-inspiring Jhordel is. It's a good thing she does, because I really though the character was ane egomaniac, selfish and quite stupid strategist. Ibrahim is a Navy Intelligence commander and still seems completely unfamiliar with protocol, spacecrafts or history or anything at all. He spends half the time feeling the "odd man out", the other half with a "knot in his stomach" because he is intimidated -and uncomfortable- by Jhordel, the circumstances, the unkown enemy, the Red Christians... and even the recycled food.
I found the whole thing irritating (from the author's preface to her last lines encouraging readers to make a donation), the story was slow and repetitive, the charactes inmatures and depth-less (despite the constant references to dark pasts that hide a lot), and I never managed to feel interested in the characters' fates (although I ended wishing Inbrahim got curt-martialed and Jhordel murdered in a mutiny just to have some excitement in the read). Disappointing.

Reviewed on 2009.12.21

Zarlah the Martian

by R. Norman Grisewood

A charming story of romance with lots of bucholic landscapes, utopic Martians and very charming 1900's science.

Full of nice imaginery and very chivalrous and virtuous characters, it has some action and drama in which the lovers must face Fate and the treat of eternal separation. Although it is sometimes a bit slow, it will leave you in a great mood.
If you don't like early 18th-19th century love concept (innocent, pure and undefeatable) you might think this is a bit corny.

Reviewed on 2009.12.21

Zero Hour

by Alexander Blade

I didn't have to much expectations on this troy, given what I had read about it while browsing the catalogue.
It turned to be much better than what I expected. The story developes nicely and Alexander Blade manages to show the world through the child's eyes in a masterful way.
Very entertaining and with a kind end (for a more dramatic one, just stop when Bobby's dad gets home and speaks to his wife)its a great story to share with your kids.

Reviewed on 2009.12.21

The Worshippers

by Damon Francis Knight

I mostly agree with R Stephan, but I would like to point out that the author manages to create a very peculiar main character (self-centered, with growing ego, who feels superior to all the rest etc etc). Destiny gives wings to Algernon Weaver's sleeping megalomania and the way this is portrayed is great.
That's what basically saved the story for me.

Reviewed on 2009.12.21

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