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Reviews by gentlemanbeggar

A Princess of Mars

by Edgar Rice Burroughs

I always associated the name Edgar Rice Burroughs with Tarzan--until I read this book. For now on, Mr. Burroughs will be a sci-fi writer in my mind. While the science in this early example of science fiction seems a bit dated, given what we now know about our solar neighbor and it's nature, it is easy to get lost in the fantasy and embrace the world of Mars and it's inhabitants. I found myself quickly suspending my disbelief and enjoying the ride as the central character, John Carter, revealed himself to be exactly what I want my heroes to be--a hero. We live in a society that is obsessed with anti-heroes and flawed protagonists, and I found it thoroughly refreshing to see a champion who knew what direction his moral compass was pointing. This is an excellent tale of heroism, love, and humanity, and I highly recommend it to anyone seeking a light leap of fantastic adventure.

Reviewed on 2010.09.26

The Chocolate Soldier

by C.T. Studd

A very stirring sermon. It really puts the lives of some great men of God into perspective. If you are a follower of Christ, this is a must read and a frightening but necessary call to action.

Reviewed on 2010.08.11

The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth

by H.G. Wells

This is an excellent example of early sci-fi. It was interesting. It was written at a time when language was still quite formal, and had a quaint "old world" feel to it, but the story structure was much more modern and contemporary. It was kind of a weird mesh of old and new that was a little unsettling at first, but once I found the rhythm of the book, I found it to be a quite enjoyable read. If you've not read it, I should warn you that modern readers might find the ending rather abrupt, but I found that it was appropriate.

Reviewed on 2010.08.01

Kim

by Rudyard Kipling

I've heard this book described as "an embarrassing novel" because of how it blatantly presents the British occupation of India as an unabashedly positive thing. As you read it, though, you can just imagine the Indian countryside in all its splendor. It's a little "trodgy" for my modern, unsophisticated eyes, but I found my way through and discovered an interesting story about a young boy finding a father figure in an old, Chinese Buddhist monk. It is interesting to note, too, that Kipling's presentation of Buddhism and Islam mainly only highlighted the similarities of both religions to more conventional Christianity. Of course, I could have been reading a subtext into it that wasn't there.

Reviewed on 2010.08.01

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Cary Allen Stone
Author Cary Allen Stone is fascinated with what makes criminals tick. In life, things are rarely black or white and readers of his award-winning Jake Roberts novels find themselves rooting for both the hero and anti-hero. Today, Stone reveals to us how an interview with a mother who murdered her six-year- old son made him want to tell his stories from a different perspective, why he doesn't write murder mysteries and how his job as a pilot influenced his writing.
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