The Web of Life

by Robert Herrick

A realistic, and to a great extent, a philosophic study of modern American life: the scene is Chicago, and the writer gives searching views of society there. The hero is a doctor, and the organization of medical practitioners is well brought out. Having saved the life of a drunkard by an operation that injures the brain, he falls in love with the man's wife, and the situation thus produced is a specimen of the problems raised. The story of the woman's futile effort to realize her character in this chaos of repressing forces, and her suicide, is tragic, but it is not unwholesome. "It is strong in that it faithfully depicts many phases of American life, and uses them to strengthen a web of fiction, which is most artistically wrought out."--Buffalo Express.

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excellent
Cover image for Web of Life, The