The Pioneers

by Katharine Susannah Prichard

A novel that tells the story of the early settlers of Australia. There is great sense of reality in this novel. Donald Cameron, the stern pioneer who shouts the gathering song of Clan Donald over his ploughed acres; Mary Cameron, his wife; the two convicts who came to Donald's cabin in his absence; the pretty heroine Deirdre, and old McNab, who is too ready with his gun, all are as real as the '49ers who thrust civilization into our own West. The story has an excellent plot; it is moving and beautiful in the telling. But behind the incidents of the book lies the larger story of the construction of a new commonwealth from materials in many cases none too promising to begin with. One feels the regeneration of character moving along with the cultivation of the land. And the book ends on the right note--that no blood strain can overpower the "adventurous, toiling strain of the men and women who came over the sea and conquered the wilderness."

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excellent
Cover image for Pioneers, The