Recent Reviews

The Room in the Tower

by E.F. Benson

An incredible short horror story. Very exciting to read. The scenes are set beautifully and a great ending!

Reviewed on 2015.03.26
by Ali

Cyrano de Bergerac (English translation)

by Edmond Rostand

Not as universal as Shakespeare, Cyrano is still a good play. The scope of human depth, although I can not be as deep as Bard's, it is still an interesting work, good but not masterpiece.

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Kiric78

The Communist Manifesto

by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

An work that is not as universal and important as Shakespeare and the Bible, influenced many people . Marx deserve credit for the changed system of capitalism and its ideals were applied in practice .

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Kiric78

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

by William Shakespeare

There is a reason why Shakespeare mastered lots of Canon , for which he is the writer with more works in the catalog, translations , sales , productions , adaptations . For the same reason , except the Bible , no other body of work has generated many critical comments as Shakespeare ( there is more books on Hamlet than on the Origin of Species and Newton 's Principia combined ) , and this is just one of the Bard 's work. Be the importance , influence, quality or canonicity , Shakespeare is the greatest of all .

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Kiric78

Hamlet

by William Shakespeare

In the history of modern literature , there are only three works that stand up as the greatest literary works of the millennium, these are:
1.Hamlet (Shakespeare)
2.Divine Comedy (Dante)
3.Don Quixote (Cervantes)

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Kiric78

The Life of Samuel Johnson, vol 1

by James Boswell

great

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by juliet

Number Seventeen

by Louis Tracy

Detectives Winter and Furneaux chase down a Chinese gang bent on murderous revenge over political reforms in their country. It's more thriller than mystery the criminals become known fairly soon, but elude capture. There's a certain amount of racism, though it's not as bad as in other books of the period. I preferred the first book in the series, "The Strange Case of Mortimer Fenley."

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Leah A. Zeldes

Nocturne

by Frank Swinnerton

This short novel covers an evening in the life of two working-class sisters, the volatile, restless Jenny and the older and more domesticated Emmy, both together and with their respective paramours. It's an interesting study of their relationships, the differences between them, and a reflection on the differences between men and women and their approach to love. Swinnerton's prose is exquisite, but the novel starts slowly, and the slice of life nature of it makes it somewhat unsatisfying. You're left wondering what will happen next.

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Leah A. Zeldes

Hushed Up!

by William le Queux

Over the top. It starts out reasonably, as the story of a criminal's efforts to go straight because of his young daughter, but then becomes pretty bizarre, with a lot of unexplained business and sensationalism. Le Queux has done much better.

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Leah A. Zeldes

The Poor Clare

by Elizabeth Gaskell

A dark, gothic story about what follows when a well-to-do man purposely kills the dog that is all a poor old woman has of her daughter's memory: She calls down curses on him that visit an evil phantom on the next generation. Very well done, but not pleasant reading.

Reviewed on 2015.03.25
by Leah A. Zeldes

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