Recent Reviews

The Arabian Nights

by Andrew Lang

This book is an abridged version of Arabian Nights. I recommend the four volume complete version available in Manybooks. The volumes are very descriptive and full.

Reviewed on 2014.11.26
by rajan

The Arabian Nights

by Andrew Lang

Sorry I gave a wrong rating earlier.

Reviewed on 2014.11.26
by rajan

The Man Who Was Thursday

by G.K. Chesterton

This wonderful book is the story of an undercover Scotland Yard detective who manages to get inside an anarchist group and gets himself elected as its representative to a European anarchist council. The is made up of seven members, with each code-named for a day of the week. The detective meets with the other members of the council and after a period of conflict discovers that they are all like him and that their leader, Sunday, has had them go after each other rather than the anarchist groups that they lead.

It is clear that there are many symbols and Christian allegory that a reader can explore when reading this book but one has to keep in mind that Chesterton was writing in the aftermath of the Chicago Haymarket Riot, the Greenwich Observatory bombing, and at a time when a fear of bomb throwing anarchists was gripping Europe. Being a very perceptive individual, Chesterton saw through much of the spin in the media and pointed to the source of much of the problem, governments and police forces that used fear and manipulated individuals to exaggerate or manufacture threats in order to divert a critical public from their own failures.

When read from that perspective the novel becomes something more than just beautiful writing and helps the reader understand certain events in the post 9/11 world. Another book that makes very similar points is Joseph Conrad's, The Secret Agent.

Reviewed on 2014.11.26
by Vangel Vesovski

Wild Wives

by Charles Willeford

Just brilliant. Funny, fast-paced, with a touch of anguish. If you have your nerves shot, this is the best cure you can have. Ingenious, humourouse, just a bit lemon dramatique. The end is wonting, too meek, too nothing, but you get 96% of good read.

Reviewed on 2014.11.25
by Elenaº

The Carnivore

by G.A. Morris

Peaceful aliens comfort the remnants of the human race after world war. Good short story with a good ending, although not the ending I had anticipated.

Reviewed on 2014.11.25
by bhold

Digging for Gold

by Robert Michael Ballantyne

A quick and entertaining read—part morality play, part adventure, part travelog. A junior Moby Dick, in other words. How accurate the descriptions of the California gold fields is hard to say.

Reviewed on 2014.11.25
by Dai Alanye

Dick o' the Fens

by George Manville Fenn

A well-written boy's book, full of interesting natural history and exciting adventure.

Reviewed on 2014.11.25
by Dai Alanye

The Duke's Motto

by Justin Huntly McCarthy

An admitted melodrama, the writing is flowery, the outcome never in doubt. A good way to kill an evening or two, not to mention innumerable villains.

Reviewed on 2014.11.25
by Dai Alanye

Some Adventures of Mr. Surelock Keys

by Herbert Beeman

Herbert Beeman was a canadian and served as secretary of the Vancouver Board of Trade in the early 1920s. During this period he published an obscure hardcover, F.O.B. For Our Bureau which was a collection of poems. He has also been credited with writing “Some Adventures Of Mr Surelock Keys, Hitherto Unrecorded” in 1913, “The Halfway House Of The Empire” in 1929 and a broadside/poem called "How to Pronounce Burrard." Beeman died in 1931.

The humor is “Some Adventures Of Mr Surelock Keys, Hitherto Unrecorded” is humor writing that at the time was considered quaint and amusing, but today's tastes would see as only silly and irrelevant.

Alan Loewen
http://www.amazon.com/Alan-Loewen/e/B009LLMD9K

Reviewed on 2014.11.24
by C. Alan Loewen

The Lot & Lottie Lottery

by Wallace Irwin

In order for San Bruno to increase its population by 5,000 people (why is never made clear), a group of town boosters decide to raffle off a subdivision lot, the house on it, and a beautiful woman to marry. This was long before there was a state lottery or Indian casinos.
Presumably, the schemers involved are supposed to be admirable. The story is rather dated, and naturally sexism runs through it.
This is not a story for children, as people smoke cigarettes without bad consequences.

Reviewed on 2014.11.24
by Lisa Carr

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