Recent Reviews

Occasion... for Disaster

by Gordon Randall Garrett

Evidently, this is the second novel in the trilogy that began with Brain Twisters. In this, the FBI agent Malone, who has precognition and is able to teleport himself, is assigned to find the Russian(?) agents who are sabotaging the nation's computers and causing errors that are bringing down the government. And the trade unions. And the Mafia.
The middle is a bit too long, but the premise is interesting; the ending is a bit confusing.
If you believe in the possibility of psi powers, you'll enjoy the story.

Reviewed on 2014.12.14
by Lisa Carr

Three Men and a Maid

by Robert Fraser

In no way similar to the Wodehouse book of the same title. this is an involved mystery/romance with some English courtroom work. A good tale.

Reviewed on 2014.12.14
by Dai Alanye

His Unknown Wife

by Louis Tracy

Requires the suspension of a degree of disbelief but a good adventure with some possibly accurate information on natural history, geography and primitive Indians. All in all, a worthwhile read.

Reviewed on 2014.12.13
by Dai Alanye

The Mystery of Murray Davenport

by Robert Neilson Stephens

An unlikely premise for the era, characters for whom it is hard to feel empathy, slow moving and excessively wordy. For me, at least, it held few pleasures.

Reviewed on 2014.12.13
by Dai Alanye

The River of Death

by Fred M. White

A prescient story of a prolonged drought and heat wave in England, leading up to the Thames shrinking. Then, Bubonic Plague is found upstream, and most of London's drinking water is cut off.
A convincing account of rioting to get water, that unfortunately pulls it punch at the end. Well, the author had to end it some way; at least they didn't turn into zombies.

Reviewed on 2014.12.13
by Lisa Carr

The Great Shadow and Other Napoleonic Tales

by Arthur Conan Doyle

It's a pleasant surprise to learn that Doyle wrote much more than Holmes and Prof Challenger. Quite well worth reading.

Reviewed on 2014.12.12
by Dai Alanye

The Green Flag

by Arthur Conan Doyle

More good short stories from Doyle. Not earthshaking but entertaining.

Reviewed on 2014.12.12
by Dai Alanye

Anderson Crow, Detective

by George Barr McCutcheon

A comedy of dumb or idiotic inhabitants of a sleepy small town in the idyllic year of 1919. The first two chapters are amusing, but all the rest is a soporific matter.

Reviewed on 2014.12.12
by Elena

Prodigal Son

by Lewis Shiner

A good detective story set in Austin, TX, about a kid who was abducted when he was two years old suddenly walking into a detective's office ten years later. But things are and are not as they seem. Each rock that gets turned over reveals another secret.
It's not a story where all the clues are spread out for you to see; you have to stick with the story and trust the detective.

Reviewed on 2014.12.11
by Lisa Carr

Foul Play

by Dion Boucicault

A book with two authors and two types of writing. One type is terse and straightforward, and goes down easily. The second type (far more common) is wordy and melodramatic, and should be skipped over rapidly. The plot is complex if slightly contrived, the story at times intriguing if unlikely, the coincidences strewn thickly.

Much of it takes place on Swiss Family Robinson Island or a similar place with impossible natural history. The hero is a wonderful laborer, accomplishing more in a forenoon than you or I could in a week.

Reviewed on 2014.12.11
by Dai Alanye

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