Scientific American Supplement, No. 433 (Apr 19, 1884)

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1884
Language: English
Wordcount: 35,679 / 112 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 39
LoC Categories: AP, Q
Downloads: 409
mnybks.net#: 364
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genre: Periodical
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Excerpt

the different departments. It is only by careful and complete organization in this, as in every business, that the best work can be done at least expense in time and capital.

In this course of instruction in Mechanical Engineering it will be observed that the writer has incorporated the scheme of a workshop course. This is done, not at all with the idea that a school of mechanical engineering is to be regarded as a "trade school," but that every engineer should have some acquaintance with the tools and the methods of work upon which the success of his own work is so largely dependent. If the mechanical engineer can acquire such knowledge in the more complete course of instruction of the trade school, either before or after his attendance at the technical school, it will be greatly to his advantage. The technical school has, however, a distinct field; and its province is not to be confounded with that of the trade school. The former is devoted to instruction in the theory and practice of a profession which

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