Chancellorsville and Gettysburg

Campaigns of the Civil War - VI

Author: Abner Doubleday
Published: 1882
Language: English
Wordcount: 69,842 / 214 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 60.6
LoC Category: D
Downloads: 1,842
Added to site: 2007.03.08
mnybks.net#: 16224
Genres: History, War
Advertisement

In writing ths narrative, which relates to the decisive campaign which freed the Northern States from invasion, it may not be out of place to state what facilities I have had for observation inthe fulfilment of so important a task. I can only say that I was, to a considerable extent, an actor in the scenes I describe, and knew the principal leaders on both sides, in consequence of my association with them at West Point, and, subsequently, in theregular army.

Show Excerpt

orsville with but little opposition, as both Lee and Stuart thought it was making for Gordonsville and the Virginia Central Railroad. In consequence of this miscalculation, Stuart planted himself at Brandy Station. When he found that he was out of position and that it was too late to prevent the crossing at Germania Ford, he made a circuit with Fitz Hugh Lee's brigade to get between Slocum and Lee, and sent W. H. F. Lee's brigade to impede Stoneman's operations. The passage of Germania Ford turned Elley's Ford and United States Ford, and Mahone's and Posey's brigades, who were on guard there, retreated on Chancellorsville, where Anderson had come up with Wright's brigade too late to prevent the crossing.

By 6 P.M. on the 30th, Hooker found himself in command of four corps at Chancellorsville, with another--that of Sickles--near at hand. Anderson fell back to Tabernacle Church as our troops advanced, and began to fortify a line there. Stuart sent Fitz Hugh Lee's brigade, which was very much exhausted, t

Cover image for

Download


show mobile phone QR code

Donate a small amount via Paypal below or read about some other ways that you can support ManyBooks.