Scandinavian influence on Southern Lowland Scotch

A Contribution to the Study of the Linguistic Relations of English and Scandinavian

Published: 1900
Language: English
Wordcount: 33,457 / 123 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 78.4
LoC Category: P
Downloads: 527
Added to site: 2005.03.06
mnybks.net#: 9934
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Excerpt

= Old Saxon. O. Sw. = Old Swedish. p. = page; pp. = pages. p. p. = past participle. pr. p. = present participle. pret. = preterite. pron. = pronounced. prep. = preposition. pl. = plural. q.v. = quod vide. Scand. = Scandinavian. Sco. = Scotch. S.S. = Southern Scotland. sb. = substantive. Sw. = Swedish. vb. = verb. W.Norse = West Norse. W. Scand. = West Scandinavian. W.S. = West Saxon. > = developed into. < = derived from. E.D.S. = English Dialect Society. E.E.T.S. = Early English Text Society. S.T.S. = Scottish Text Society.


There has been considerable confusion in the use of the terms Norse and Danish. Either has been used to include the other, or, again, in a still wider sense, as synonymous with Scandinavian; as, for instance, when we speak of the Danish kingdoms in Dublin, or Norse elements in Anglo-Saxon. Danish is the language of Denmark, Norse the language of Norway. When I use the term Old Danish I mean that dialect of Old Scandinavian, or Old Northern, that developed on Danish soil. By O

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