The Soul of Democracy

The Philosophy Of The World War In Relation To Human Liberty

Language: English
Wordcount: 28,062 / 89 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 47.8
LoC Category: B
Downloads: 816
Added to site: 2004.06.30
mnybks.net#: 8052
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genres: Philosophy, War
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An inspired analysis of the war's effect upon our social philosophy and upon the future democracy.

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hus voluntary, surely the French soldiers, man for man, have proved themselves the equal of any soldiers on earth.

The anomaly of the first two years of the War was the presence of the vast Russian autocratic empire on the side of the allied democracies. For Russia, however, the War was of the people, rather than of the autocracy at the top, and one saw that Russia would emerge from the War changed and purified. What one could not foresee was that, under the awakening of the people, Russia could pass, in a day, through a Revolution as profound in its character and consequences as the great explosion in France. It would be almost a miracle if so complete a Revolution, in such a vast, benighted empire, were not followed by decades of recurrent chaos and anarchy. If Russia avoids this fate, she will present a unique experience in history. The tendency to abrogate all authority, the spectacle of regiments of soldiers becoming debating societies to discuss whether or not they shall obey orders and fight, are

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