The Nature of Animal Light

Published: 1920
Language: English
Wordcount: 48,675 / 180 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: -85.6
LoC Category: QL
Downloads: 480
Added to site: 2010.11.26
mnybks.net#: 29697
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genres: Science, Nature
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Bioluminescence, the production of light by animals and plants, has always excited the admiration of the layman and the wonder of the scientist. It is not surprising that an enormous literature dealing with the subject has grown up. A large part of this literature, however, is made up merely of reports that a certain animal is luminous, or records of especially brilliant phosphorescence of the sea. It is not the purpose of this book to deal with every phase of bioluminescence. We shall be concerned largely with the physical characteristics of animal light and the chemical processes underlying its production.

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ina, Marasinium, Clitocybe, Corticium. Gasteromycetes (Stinkhorns and puff-balls)

II. Bryophyta Hepaticæ (Liverworts) Musci (Mosses)

III. Pteridophyta Equisetineæ (Horsetails) Salviniæ (Salvinia, Marsilia, etc.) Lycopodineæ (Club Mosses) Filicineæ (Ferns)

IV. Spermatophyta Gymnospermæ (Cycads, Ginkgo, Conifers) Angiospermæ (Mono- and Dicotyledonous flowering plants).

ANIMAL KINGDOM

I. Protozoa. (One-celled animals) Sarcodina Rhizopoda Heliozoa Radiolaria Thallassicola, Myxosphæra, Collosphæra, Collozoum, Sphærozoum. Mastigophora Flagellata Choanoflagellata Dinoflagellata Ceratium, Peridinium, Prorocentrum, Pyrodinium, Gonyaulax, Blepharocysta, Amphidinium, Diplopsalis, Cochlodinium, Sph

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