In the Reign of Terror

The Adventures of a Westminster Boy

Author: G. A. Henty
Published: 1887
Language: English
Wordcount: 93,649 / 248 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 66.2
LoC Categories: PR, PZ
Downloads: 1,603
mnybks.net#: 3484
Origin: gutenberg.org
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Harry Sandwith, a Westminster boy, becomes a resident at the chateau of a French marquis, and after various adventures accompanies the family to Paris at the crisis of the Revolution. Imprisonment and death reduce their number, and the hero finds himself beset by perils with the three young daughters of the house in his charge . The stress of trial brings out in him all the best English qualities of pluck and endurance, and after hair-breadth escapes they reach Nantes. There the girls are condemned to death in the coffin-ships Les Noyades, but are saved by the unfailing courage of their boy-protector.

"Harry Sandwith, the Westminster boy, may fairly be said to beat Mr. Henty's record. His adventures will delight boys by the audacity and peril they depict. The story is one of Mr. Henty's best."--Saturday Review.

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strange and hazardous adventure.

Three days after the arrival of the letter of the marquis, Dr. Sandwith and Harry started by stage for Dover, and the doctor put his son on board the packet sailing for Calais. The evening before, he gave him much good advice as to his behaviour.

"You will see much that is new, and perhaps a good deal that you don't like, Harry, but it is better for you never to criticize or give a hostile opinion about things; you would not like it if a French boy came over here and made unpleasant remarks about English ways and manners. Take things as they come and do as others do; avoid all comparisons between French and English customs; fall in with the ways of those around you; and adopt as far as you can the polite and courteous manner which is general among the French, and in which, I must say, they are far ahead of us. If questioned, you will, of course, give your opinion frankly and modestly; it is the independence of thought among English boys which has attracted the at

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Average Rating of 4 from 1 reviews: ****
2007.11.28
Gordon Berlyne
****.

One of Henty's most readable Books. Bearing in mind that when it was written (1888) it was nearer in time to the event than it is to the present day, it's an excellent way of getting the feel of the time, with plenty of 'Adventure' to keep the young reader involved. As good, in my opinion, as Dicken's "A Tale of Two Cities" (1859). Both will give a good flavour of the French Revolution. Henty's, however, has a much happier ending !

Gordon Berlyne OBE


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