Domestic Life in Virginia in the Seventeenth Century

Jamestown 350th Anniversary Historical Booklet Number 17

Published: 1957
Language: English
Wordcount: 30,183 / 103 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 55.7
LoC Category: D
Downloads: 554
Added to site: 2008.12.11
mnybks.net#: 22829
Genre: History
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Excerpt

their own passages. Similarly, each could claim an additional fifty acres in the name of every person whose passage he paid. This was known as the headright system of granting land. Thus, a man with a wife, three children and two servants, was entitled to 350 acres. Not only did these generous provisions, for the acquisition of landed estates, lure settlers to the new world, but they provided a sound base for the beginning of a secure domestic life in the colony.

Unfortunately, there is no complete list of the women who came to Virginia prior to 1616, but, in addition to those heretofore named, the presence of others is recorded. Joane Salford, wife of Robert Salford of Elizabeth City, came by 1611, and Salford's sister Sarah reached Virginia at the same time, or just a year or so later. Susan, wife of John Collins of West and Shirley Hundred, came in the Treasurer, 1613. Elizabeth, wife of Lieutenant Albiano Lupo, came in the George, 1616, and little Susan Old was brought by her cous

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