Some War-time Lessons

The Soldier's Standards of Conduct; The War As a Practical Test of American Scholarship; What Have We Learned?

Published: 1920
Language: English
Wordcount: 19,931 / 64 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 44.1
LoC Category: U
Downloads: 525
Added to site: 2010.05.31
mnybks.net#: 27974
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genres: War, Essays, Non-fiction
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Excerpt

ite down what he regarded as the three very worst faults against which a soldier should be on his guard. When the answers were collected, one word appeared on practically every slip of paper, cowardice; the second was not so nearly unanimous, but appears on a strong majority of the papers, selfishness; and the third was evidently conceitedness, though the defect was worded in different ways, as big head, crust, and the like.

In other words, the virtues which the soldier most admires and regarding which he had evidently learned the most valuable lessons, are courage, unselfishness or coöperativeness, and modesty.

The record of our soldiers has proved beyond a doubt that once you get men into groups with a common and a worth-while purpose, courage--both the reckless courage that comes by instinct and that higher type, the courage of the man who recognizes his danger--can no longer be assumed to be a rare virtue. It is a very common virtue. Cowardic

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