Aboriginal American Weaving

Published: 1910
Language: English
Wordcount: 3,444 / 17 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 57.3
LoC Category: D
Downloads: 2,151
Added to site: 2008.02.11
mnybks.net#: 20025
Genre: History
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Excerpt

The checker weaving of the mat is now begun at the left edge by doubling the weft element over the last warp and then weaving with the doubled element over and under one warp until the right edge is reached where it is turned back and slipped under an inch of the weaving just completed. Figure 1 shows a squaw at work on such a mat, and when she has completed this half of the mat the second half will be undertaken. She finishes the edge by turning up the warp ends below the last line of weft and binds them with a row of twining just above this last weft.

[Illustration: FIGURE 2.--MAT WITH CHECKED DESIGN.]

In their industries, primitive people always utilize the materials found in their environment, because no means is afforded them, as in modern life, for the transportation of materials from a distance. British Columbia is rich in cedar trees, so it is not strange that material from this tree enters so largely into the weaving of this region. Cedar bark lends itself very delightfully to the technic of these mats, and its golden brown checked surface is at times crossed by black lines or broken by a group of black checks in simple designs. These vary greatly, but only one example (Figure 2) can be shown here.

[Illustration: FIGURE 3.--PRIMITIVE LOOM WITH PLAITED MAT.]

The second type of weaving, also of cedar bark, is begun like the last mat, but the elements

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