Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes

First Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1879-1880,Government Printing Office, Washington, 1881, pages 263-552

Author: Garrick Mallery
Published: 1881
Language: English
Wordcount: 121,866 / 386 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 46.2
LoC Category: P
Downloads: 731
Added to site: 2006.01.04
mnybks.net#: 10897
Genre: Language
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Excerpt

he large number of corporeal gestures expressing intellectual operations require and admit of more variety and conventionality. Thus the features and the body among all mankind act almost uniformly in exhibiting fear, grief, surprise, and shame, but all objective conceptions are varied and variously portrayed. Even such simple indications as those for "no" and "yes" appear in several differing motions. While, therefore, the terms sign language and gesture speech necessarily include and suppose facial expression when emotions are in question, they refer more particularly to corporeal motions and attitudes. For this reason much of the valuable contribution of DARWIN in his Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals is not directly applicable to sign language. His analysis of emotional gestures into those explained on the principles of serviceable associated habits, of antithesis, and of the constitution of the nervous system, should, nevertheless, always be remembered. Even if it does not strictly e

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