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The Wiradyuri and Other Languages of New South Wales

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Published: 1898
Language: English
Wordcount: 8,274 / 41 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 52.7
LoC Category: Q
Downloads: 473
Added to site: 2006.08.04
mnybks.net#: 14581
Genres: Language, Science
Excerpt

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There is no passive. The sentence, A woman was bitten by a dog, is expressed by, A dog bit a woman.

The prohibitive or negative in all the moods, tenses, and numbers is obtained by using the word Kurria with the verb, thus: Kurria buma, beat not. Kurria bumulgiridyu, I will not beat. Another form is used where there is uncertainty, as, Wirraigurra bumulgiridyu, which expressed the meaning "I don't think I will beat," or, "Perhaps I will not."

Murrung nginyadhu has the meaning of "I am well," and may be called a substitute for our verb "to be." By incorporating yalu with this expression, it makes it more emphatic, as, Yalu murrung nginyadhu, "Really I am well." Any adjective describing a human attribute may be taken as a predicate, as, good, bad, strong, sleepy, and employed with the modifications of the word nginya.

Prepositions.

A number of prepositions are independent words, as: Behind,

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