A Mechanico-Physiological Theory of Organic Evolution

Published: 1898
Language: English
Wordcount: 15,101 / 55 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 40.7
LoC Category: Q
Downloads: 595
Added to site: 2010.08.23
mnybks.net#: 28784
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genre: Science
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Excerpt

he strands of this network consist, in conformity with their origin, of parallel rows of micellæ extending lengthwise. These rows of micellæ are combined into more or less complex arrangements, so that the cross section of the strand represents the configuration of the idioplasm.[B]

[B] Nägeli makes his idioplasm ramify throughout the organism in unbroken continuity, much like a system of nerves in the higher animals. This idea with Nägeli was purely speculative. It was known that the protoplasm is in connection throughout the organism, but it has been proved more recently that only the somatic protoplasm is thus connected. The part in which the essential nature of the organism is contained is localized in the nucleus and hence might properly be designated as nucleoplasm, as Weismann suggests. If the idioplasm is localized in the nucleus, it cannot be continuous throughout the system, as Nägeli assumes. But this objection applies only to a detail of the theory and does not af

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