Thirty

Published: 1915
Language: English
Wordcount: 71,635 / 214 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 78.8
LoC Category: PS
Downloads: 660
Added to site: 2010.07.09
mnybks.net#: 28413
Origin: gutenberg.org
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A newspaper story in part, the hero being a reporter of a most unusual turn of mind and experience of the world; but the main theme has to do with the regeneration of some youthful and heedless but really lovable members of the most aristocratic and wealthy caste of the great city Chicago, through the agency of the hero reporter.

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turned to her with the same galling indifference that had so offended Roger before. She could not but admire the assurance of his manner in the face of such open hostility.

"Miss Wynrod," he went on calmly, "I do hope you will talk to me frankly. Won't you tell me what you honestly think of your relations, first to this business at Algoma, and then ..."

"Don't say a word," interrupted Roger. "Remember the sheet he represents."

Judith did remember, and the recollection made her angry. She smarted still at the cartoons and denunciatory editorials in which she had so frequently been singled out for attack.

"Don't you think it's just a little curious, Mr. Good," she asked quietly, "that you should come to me in this way when you must know how your own paper has treated me?"

A pained expression crossed his eyes.

"It is a little queer," he admitted. "And honestly I don't like the roasts they give you any better than you do. But don't you see that in a way you're responsible

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Average Rating of 5 from 1 reviews: *****
2010.08.08
Leah A. Zeldes
*****

A wonderfully absorbing novel, by a writer who later became a Chicago Daily News columnist -- part rousing newspaper yarn, part bildungsroman, with a touch of romance -- about the impact of an idealistic, working-class newsman on a wealthy, aristocratic woman and her scapegrace brother. The interaction of Brent Good and Judith Wynrod reminds me a bit of Macauley Connor and Tracy Lord in "The Philadelphia Story," if that had been more serious and less romantic.

There's no local color -- indeed no indication of what big city the story is set in at all -- but "Thirty" shows newspaper journalism as it was until fairly recently ... as well as the split between the owning and the working classes that has become ever wider.


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