The Writings of Thomas Paine, Volume III

1791-1804

Author: Thomas Paine
Published: 1895
Language: English
Wordcount: 159,952 / 468 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 57.1
LoC Categories: B, J
Downloads: 1,972
Added to site: 2010.07.31
mnybks.net#: 28586
Origin: gutenberg.org
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I. THE REPUBLICAN PROCLAMATION
II. TO THE AUTHORS OF "LE RÉPUBLICAIN."
III. TO THE ABBÉ SIÈYES
IV. TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
V. TO MR. SECRETARY DUNDAS
VI. LETTERS TO ONSLOW CRANLEY
VII. TO THE SHERIFF OF THE COUNTY OF SUSSEX,
VIII. TO MR. SECRETARY DUNDAS
IX. LETTER ADDRESSED TO THE ADDRESSERS ON THE LATE PROCLAMATION
X. ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE OF FRANCE
XI. ANTI-MONARCHAL ESSAY FOR THE USE OF NEW REPUBLICANS
XII. TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, ON THE PROSECUTION AGAINST THE SECOND PART
XIII. ON THE PROPRIETY OF BRINGING LOUIS XVI. TO TRIAL
XIV. REASONS FOR PRESERVING THE LIFE OF LOUIS CAPET,
XV. SHALL LOUIS XVI. HAVE RESPITE?
XVI. DECLARATION OF RIGHTS
XVII. PRIVATE LETTERS TO JEFFERSON
XVIII. LETTER TO DANTON
XIX. A CITIZEN OF AMERICA TO THE CITIZENS OF EUROPE
XX. APPEAL TO THE CONVENTION
XXI. THE MEMORIAL TO MONROE
XXII. LETTER TO GEORGE WASHINGTON
XXIII. OBSERVATIONS
XXIV. DISSERTATION ON FIRST PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT
XXV. THE CONSTITUTION OF 1795
XXVI. THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE ENGLISH SYSTEM OF FINANCE
XXVII. FORGETFULNESS
XXVIII. AGRARIAN JUSTICE
XXIX. THE EIGHTEENTH FRUCTIDOR
XXX. THE RECALL OF MONROE
XXXI. PRIVATE LETTER TO PRESIDENT JEFFERSON
XXXII. PROPOSAL THAT LOUISIANA BE PURCHASED
XXXIII. THOMAS PAINE TO THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES,
XXXIV. TO THE FRENCH INHABITANTS OF LOUISIANA

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's works at his so-called "Hive of Liberty." Muir, a Scotch lawyer, was banished to Botany Bay for fourteen years for having got up in Edinburgh (1792) a "Convention," in imitation of that just opened in Paris; two years later he escaped from Botany Bay on an American ship, and found his way to Paine in Paris. Among these coins there are two of opposite character. A farthing represents Pitt on a gibbet, against which rests a ladder; inscription, "End of P [here an eye] T." Reverse, face of Pitt conjoined with that of the devil, and legend, "Even Fellows." Another farthing like the last, except an added legend, "Such is the reward of tyrants, 1796." These anti-Pitt farthings were struck by Thomas Spence.

In the winter of 1792-3 the only Reign of Terror was in England. The Ministry had replied to Paine's "Rights of Man" by a royal proclamation against seditious literature, surrounding London with militia, and calling a meeting of Parliament (December, 1792) out of season. Even before the trial o

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