James Cutbush

An American Chemist, 1788-1823

Author: Edgar F. Smith
Published: 1919
Language: English
Wordcount: 13,196 / 47 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 45.2
LoC Categories: CT, QD
Downloads: 381
Added to site: 2008.02.28
mnybks.net#: 20182
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genre: Biography
Buy new from: Amazon or Barnes & Noble
Find it used: eBay or AbeBooks
Get as AudioBook: Audible or AudioBooks.com

There is nothing thrilling in the following pages. They contain the story of the life-work of a very modest man deeply interested in and enamoured with the science of chemistry, who sought also to inspire others and to familiarize the general public of his time with the intimate connection of chemistry with manufactures and things which enter so largely into every-day occupations. He was an active member of a small group of chemists who, in the early years of eighteen hundred, caused thousands of the laity to give thought to the possibilities of Chemistry, and in addition was a pioneer in pyrotechnics, on which account he is deservedly entitled to every recognition. More than a century has passed since his most serious efforts were put forth. However, it will not be long until that early galaxy of chemical enthusiasts of which he was a member will be accorded a high place in the history of the development of the science in America.

Show Excerpt

on from Cutbush which appears years later reads as follows:

"The deflagrator of Professor Hare of Philadelphia is an apparatus well calculated for many interesting experiments on galvanism. To that gentleman we are indebted for the compound blowpipe, which produces a very intense heat by the combustion of hydrogen in contact with oxygen gas. Notwithstanding Professor Clark of England has laid claim to the apparatus, and the use of hydrogen gas in this way, the merit of the discovery is due to our learned and ingenious countryman."

The next few years in the life of Cutbush were most interesting. He enjoyed mingling with his fellows, and it is recorded that in 1810 he became a member of Lodge No. 2, Free and Accepted Masons, comprising in its membership General Peter Muhlenberg and many other distinguished Philadelphians in various walks of life. Upon them he made an exceedingly favorable impression, because in June of 1811, Cutbush was made presiding officer of his Lodge and frequently thereafter

Cover image for

Download


show mobile phone QR code

Donate a small amount via Paypal below or read about some other ways that you can support ManyBooks.