Something of Men I Have Known

With Some Papers of a General Nature, Political, Historical, and Retrospective

Published: 1909
Language: English
Wordcount: 148,548 / 444 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 56
LoC Category: D
Downloads: 398
Added to site: 2006.11.10
mnybks.net#: 15196
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Excerpt

ill invoked, none had filled larger space than did Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson. The former was the early political idol of Mr. Lincoln; the latter, of Mr. Douglas. Possibly, since the foundation of the Government, no statesman has been so completely idolized by his friends and party as was Henry Clay. Words are meaningless when the attempt is made to express the idolatry of the Whigs of his own State for their great chieftain. For a lifetime he knew no rival. His wish was law to his followers. In the realm of party leadership a greater than he hath not appeared. At his last defeat for the Presidency strong men wept bitter tears. When his star set, it was felt to be the signal for the dissolution of the great party of which he was the founder. In words worthy to be recalled, "when the tidings came like wailing over the State that Harry Percy's spur was cold, the chivalrous felt somehow the world had grown commonplace."

The following incident, along the line indicated, may be considered characteristic.

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