Myths and Legends of the Great Plains

Author: Unknown
Published: 1913
Language: English
Wordcount: 36,719 / 108 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 86.1
LoC Category: BL
Downloads: 2,027
Added to site: 2007.07.17
mnybks.net#: 17664
Genre: Myth
Advertisement

Selected and Edited by Katharine Berry Judson. The authorities used in this compilation are those found in the annual reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology and the Publications of the United States Geographical and Geological Survey: contributions to North American Ethnology. Of the various ethnologists whose work has been used, those of especial importance are Alice C. Fletcher, whose wonderful work among the Omaha and Pawnee Indians is deserving of the most careful study, J. Owen Dorsey, James Mooney, and S. R. Riggs.

Show Excerpt

ns, so they called him back, but the Cherokee country remains full of mountains to this day. [This was the original home, in North Carolina.]

When the earth was dry and the animals came down, it was still dark. Therefore they got the sun and set it in a track to go every day across the island from east to west, just overhead. It was too hot this way. Red Crawfish had his shell scorched a bright red, so that his meat was spoiled. Therefore the Cherokees do not eat it.

Then the medicine men raised the sun a handsbreadth in the air, but it was still too hot. They raised it another time; and then another time; at last they had raised it seven handsbreadths so that it was just under the sky arch. Then it was right and they left it so. That is why the medicine men called the high place "the seventh height." Every day the sun goes along under this arch on the under side; it returns at night on the upper side of the arch to its starting place.

There is another world under this earth. It is like t

Cover image for

Download


show mobile phone QR code

Donate a small amount via Paypal below or read about some other ways that you can support ManyBooks.