The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VII

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1907
Language: English
Wordcount: 47,794 / 140 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 84.7
LoC Category: PS
Downloads: 573
Added to site: 2006.09.19
mnybks.net#: 14652
Origin: gutenberg.org
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Find it used: eBay or AbeBooks
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Alphabet of Celebrities, by Herford -- Assault and Battery, by Baldwin -- The Associated Widows, by Roof -- Bill Nations, by Arp -- The Brakeman at Church, by Burdette -- Breitmann and the Turners, by Leland -- By Bay and Sea, by Bangs -- The Camp-Meeting, by Hall -- The Critic, by Lampton -- A Cupid, A Crook, by Townsend -- The Dubious Future, by Nye -- An Educational Project, by Greene -- Fable, by Emerson -- The Goat, by Munkittrick -- The Happy Land, by Batchelder -- He and She, by Ironquill -- Holly Song, by Scollard -- How Mr. Terrapin Lost His Beard, by Culbertson -- How Mr. Terrapin Lost His Plumage and Whistle, by Culbertson -- In Defense of an Offering, by Ford -- It is Time to Begin to Conclude, by Laidlaw -- Jack Balcomb's Pleasant Ways, by Nicholson -- The Lost Inventor, by Irwin -- Margins, by Burdette -- My Cigarette, by Lummis -- Nonsense Verses, by Burgess -- Notary of Perigueux, by Longfellow -- Nothin' Done, by Stinson -- Omar in the Klondyke, by Sutherland -- The Prayer of Cyrus Brown, by Foss -- A Rhyme for Christmas, by Challing -- The Siege of Djklxprwbz, by Ironquill -- The Skeleton in the Closet, by Hale -- Songs Without Words, by Burdette -- Talk, by Paul -- Triolets -- Two Cases of Grip, by Quad -- Utah, by Field -- The Wicked Zebra, by Batchelder -- Winter Fancy, by Munkittrick -- What She Said About It, by Paul -- The Woman-Hater Reformed, by Greene -- Women and Bargains, by Allen. Edited by Marshall P. Wilder

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n's confusion was genuine.

"Why, Presidio is--do you mind sitting down at one of these tables? I feel a little shaky--making such a break!"

He explained that he was the hotel's detective, and had been on the city's police force. In both places he had dealings with a confidence man, called Presidio--after the part of the city he came from. Presidio was an odd lot; had enough skill in several occupations to earn honest wages, but seemed unable to forego the pleasure of exercising his wit in confidence games and sneak-thievery. Among his honest accomplishments was the ability to perform sleight-of-hand tricks well enough to work profitably in the lesser theater circuits. He had married a woman who made part of the show Presidio operated for a time--a good-looking woman, but as ready to turn a confidence trick as to help her husband's stage work, or do a song and dance as an interlude. They had been warned to leave San Francisco for a year, and not to return then, unless bringing proof that they had

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