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Notes and Queries, No. 209, October 29 1853

A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Geneologists, etc.

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Author: Various Authors
Published: 1853
Language: English
Wordcount: 23,491 / 82 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 78.2
LoC Category: AP
Downloads: 627
Added to site: 2008.12.21
mnybks.net#: 22933
Genre: Periodical
Excerpt

hesse de Nevers, Aux yeux verts," &c.

And lastly, see Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act IV. Sc. 4., where the ordinary text has:

"Her eyes are grey as glass, and so are mine."

Here "The MS. corrector of the folio 1682 converts 'grey' into 'green:' 'Her eyes are green as {408} grass;' and such, we have good reason to suppose, was the true reading." (Collier's Shakspeare Notes and Emendations, p. 25.)

The modern slang, "Do you see anything green in my eye?" can hardly, I suppose, be called in evidence on the question of beauty or ugliness. Is there any more to be found in favour of "green eyes?"

HARRY LEROY TEMPLE.

* * * * *

SHAKSPEARE CORRESPONDENCE.

On the Death of Falstaff (Vol. viii., p. 314.).--The remarks of your correspondents J. B. and NEMO on this subject are so obvious, and I think I may also admit in a measure so just, that it appears to me only respectful to them, and to all

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