Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 5

'Cat' to 'Celt'

Author: Various Authors
Published: 1906
Language: English
Wordcount: 238,293 / 740 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 52.9
LoC Category: AE
Downloads: 847
Added to site: 2010.07.24
mnybks.net#: 28519
Genre: Reference
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Excerpt

esticated breeds has not yet been determined. Hares, rabbits, field-mice, water-rats, rats, squirrels, moles, game-birds, pigeons, and small birds, form the chief food of the wild cat.

Apart from the above-mentioned division of the striped members of both groups into two types according to the pattern of their markings, the domesticated cats of western Europe are divided into a short-haired and a long-haired group. Of these, the former is the one which bears the closest relationship to the wild cats of Africa and of Europe, the latter being an importation from the East. The striped (as distinct from the blotched) short-haired tabby is probably the one most nearly allied to the wild ancestors, the stripes being, however, to a great extent due to the European wild cat. In one direction the tabby shows a tendency to melanism which culminates in complete blackness, while in the other direction there is an equally marked tendency to albinism; grey cats, which may be regarded as tabbies whose stripes have di

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