Seasoning of Wood

Published: 1917
Language: English
Wordcount: 83,145 / 280 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 60.6
LoC Category: TS
Downloads: 1,553
Added to site: 2008.09.12
mnybks.net#: 22035
Genre: Instructional
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Find it used: eBay or AbeBooks
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A treatise on the natural and artificial processes employed in the preparation of lumber for manufacture, with detailed explanations of its uses, characteristics and properties.

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upon entirely. Furthermore, structure underlies nearly all the technical properties of this important product, and furnishes an explanation why one piece differs in these properties from another. Structure explains why oak is heavier, stronger, and tougher than pine; why it is harder to saw and plane, and why it is so much more difficult to season without injury. From its less porous structure alone it is evident that a piece of young and thrifty oak is stronger than the porous wood of an old or stunted tree, or that a Georgia or long-leaf pine excels white pine in weight and strength.

Keeping especially in mind the arrangement and direction of the fibres of wood, it is clear at once why knots and "cross-grain" interfere with the strength of timber. It is due to the structural peculiarities that "honeycombing" occurs in rapid seasoning, that checks or cracks extend radially and follow pith rays, that tangent or "bastard" cut stock shrinks and warps more than that which is quarter-sawn. These same pecu

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