Flag and Fleet

How the British Navy Won the Freedom of the Seas

Author: William Wood
Published: 1919
Language: English
Wordcount: 82,916 / 240 pg
Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease: 74.7
LoC Categories: D, V
Downloads: 1,405
Added to site: 2006.11.18
mnybks.net#: 15289
Origin: gutenberg.org
Genres: Nautical, History, War
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Colonel Wood has endeavored to make plain, in a stirring and attractive manner, the value of Britain's Sea-Power. To read his Flag and Fleet will ensure that the lessons of centuries of war will be learnt, and that the most important lesson of them all is this--that, as an empire, we came into being by the Sea, and that we cannot exist without the Sea.

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ust as well as the British Grand Fleet commanded the North Sea in the Great War; and for the same reason, because their enemy was not strong enough to stop them. Whichever army can drive its enemy off the roads must win the war, because it can get what it wants from its base, (that is, from the places where its supplies of men and arms and food and every other need are kept); while its enemy will have to go without, being unable to get anything like enough, by bad and roundabout ways, to keep up the fight against men who can use the good straight roads. So it is with navies. The navy that can beat its enemy from all the shortest ways across the sea must win the war, because the merchant ships of its own country, like its men-of-war, can use the best routes from the bases to the front and back again; while the merchant ships of its enemy must either lose time by roundabout voyages or, what is sure to happen as the war goes on, be driven off the high seas altogether.

The savages of long ago often took to

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