LOTS OF EBOOKS. 100 % FREE

Welcome to your friendly neighborhood library. We have more than 50,000 free ebooks waiting to be discovered.

FREE AND DISCOUNTED BESTSELLERS

Join 150,000+ fellow readers. Get free and discounted bestsellers straight to your inbox with the ManyBooks eBook deals newsletter. Signup now

The Ultimate Guide to Free eBooks

Not sure what to read next? Explore our catalog of public domain books with our editors. Some real gems are hidden in our library. Read more

Browse genres

(view all)

Editor's choice

(view all)

Today's Free Ebooks and Deals

Prince of Never
By Juno Heart
$0.99
$1.99
Prince of Never: A Fae Romance
By Juno Heart
$0.99
$1.99
Wake Up!
By Claudia Velandia
$0.99
$1.99
Dragon Thief
By Marc Secchia
$0.00
$3.99
The Story Collector
By Evie Gaughan
$0.99
$2.99
Wake Up!: How to Get Out of Your Mind, Stop Living on Autopilot, and Start Choosing Your Best Life
By Claudia Velandia
$0.99
$1.99
Geronimo Jim
By J. S. Lome
$0.00
$0.00
Sweet Dreams
By Mike Faricy
$0.99
$3.99
Insects: The Complete Series
By John Koloen
$0.99
$9.99
The Granite Key
By N. S. Wikarski
$0.00
$2.99
Blood Lust
By Bernard Lee DeLeo
$0.00
$3.99

Recently Answered Questions

(view all)
I'm still not sure if I'm more frustrated by Katniss Everdeen or Suzanne Collins for how the character was portrayed in Mockinjay. The entire book just depressed me as I watched Katniss slide further into madness and despair.

Alex DeLarge from A Clockwork Orange isn't very likeable either, but I suppose that was the point of the book.

Nick Caraway is a pretty frustrating character too. I enjoyed The Great Gatsby as a whole, but just never really liked Nick as a narrator.

And finally, my most controversial choice, Daenerys Targaryen from A Song of Ice and Fire. The way she becomes more pompous the more power she gains just rubs me the wrong way.
I can see that this is going to be a hard question to answer and not just because of the misspelling! Politics is already an extremely divisive subject, but you didn't mention the country where you are from or what you are interested in, which can make a colossal difference. I know Americans like to think that their political system is the only one in the world that actually matters, but anyone who steps outside of their political bubble and take a look at the world around them are in for a rude awakening. There are so many countries with such different political systems that you could literally spend your entire life trying to study and understand them. Anyway, I'm going to try and restrain myself from writing a lot of paragraphs about the subject here because it is a topic that I can talk about forever. I'm also only going to recommend a single book to you, but despite its age, it is the one and only book that you really need to read to understand people and politics. If you have ever heard the phrase absolute power corrupts absolutely, then you will already be familiar with the author. The book is called The Prince and it was written by an Italian philosopher called Machiavelli.
My Sister's Keeper, Angela's Ashes, The Fault in Our Stars, The Lovely Bones, The Shack, these are all the usual answers I get when I ask people this exact same question. However, I have read all of them and many others and not one of them have ever managed to make me shed a tear. I'll concede that I did feel a little melancholic after reading a few of the books, but I never got to experience "ugly crying" or whatever it is that most other readers describe. I even tried reading the Fred Gipson classic, Old Yeller, but the tears just would not come. Then my sister recommended the Harry Potter books to me, which I have been avoiding because as far as I was concerned they were aimed at children and not teenagers. By the time that I reached Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows I didn't want the series to end, but end it did and I finally found myself crying until it felt like my chest hurt. I'm not saying my experience will be the same for everyone, but sometimes it is the most unexpected tales that can touch us the deepest I guess.
The Dragon Librarian by Marc Secchia is a breath of fresh air in a genre that is overcrowded with imposing heroes who can conquer any challenge through brute strength. Here the protagonist is a girl named Auli-Ambar who is not only disfigured, but also blind, which makes her fit for only the most menial tasks in the eyes of others. However, her life changes when she is taken to the Halls of the Dragons and becomes a cleaner of Dragon roosts. It is here where Auli becomes drawn to the Dragon Library despite the fact her blindness means she will never be able to read the books. She also discovers that while she possess magic, it is more of a curse as its only use is to make others forget her existence. Despite all of this adversity, Auli finds a new purpose when she encounters a young Dragon scholar who takes a special interest in her.
Animal Farm by George Orwell springs to mind as I don't think I got all of the subtext of this book when I read it the first time as a youngster. I did find it very funny when the animals in the book banded together and chased all of the humans off the farm. The Battle of the Cowshed was also quite entertaining to read. It wasn't until I was much older and saw people discussing Animal Farm that things began to fall into place for me and I saw the book for what it really is. Another book that perplexed me a lot when I was younger, but finally made a lot more sense when I read it as an adult was The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka.