LOTS OF EBOOKS. 100 % FREE

Welcome to your friendly neighborhood library. We have more than 50,000 free ebooks waiting to be discovered.

FREE AND DISCOUNTED BESTSELLERS

Join 150,000+ fellow readers. Get free and discounted bestsellers straight to your inbox with the ManyBooks eBook deals newsletter. Signup now

The Ultimate Guide to Free eBooks

Not sure what to read next? Explore our catalog of public domain books with our editors. Some real gems are hidden in our library. Read more

Browse genres

(view all)

Editor's choice

(view all)

Today's Free Ebooks and Deals

A Dead Red Alibi (The Dead Red Mystery Series, Book 4)
By RP Dahlke
$0.00
$3.99
Healing Hearts
By Mary Jane Morgan
$0.00
$3.99
Just Add Water
By Jinx Schwartz
$0.00
$3.99
Origin: Children of the Spear: Book One
By Rhett Gervais
$0.99
$1.99
Just Add Water (Hetta Coffey Series, Book 1)
By Jinx Schwartz
$0.00
$3.99
Savage Children
By Peter Boland
$0.99
$2.99
Moon Tortured
By Mckenzie Hunter
$0.99
$3.99
Joined
By Mara Gan
$0.99
$3.49
Origin
By Rhett Gervais
$0.99
$1.99
A Dead Red Alibi
By RP Dahlke
$0.00
$3.99
The Charmed Locket
By Elina Vale
$0.99
$2.99

Recently Answered Questions

(view all)
In my opinion, the movie of Fahrenheit 451 was much better than the book; the characterisation and plot was more believable. To expand further would spoil the book for anyone wanting to read it.

Also, the Truman Capote novella Breakfast At Tiffany's is very much darker and, to me, less satisfying that the amazing movie. It's almost an entirely different story told from the point of view of Holly's neighbour. The ending was drastically changed for the film, for the better, in my view.
I have a good one for you. It's by Laurie Halse Anderson and it is called "Speak." The whole book is written in diary format by a girl named Melinda who basically loses the ability to talk to others around her after a traumatic incident. I cannot explain more about what the trauma is about without spoiling some elements, so you'll just have to take my word for it that this is a really good book. I found out much later that the author actually based some elements of the story on her own life, which is a bit sad, but explains why she was able to write everything in such a clear and expressive manner.
This is quite a broad question really. Do you mean male romance authors who write for a female audience? Male romance authors who write for a male audience? Or male romance authors who write for a gay audience, because there are ones for all of the above. Whether or not they are all good I cannot say because I haven't read all of them, but there are definitely good ones. Probably the most famous one of them all is Nicholas Sparks in my opinion. I don't think that you can call yourself a fan of romance novels if you haven't read his 1996 novel, The Notebook. Sparks also wrote Message in a Bottle, A Walk to Remember, The Rescue, A Bend in the Road, The Lucky One, Safe Haven, The Best of Me, and See Me. I know that some readers and critics find Sparks to be a little too sappy and sentimental when it comes to romance, but I prefer that over the smut that some authors try to pass off as romance these days. All I know is that Sparks has written more romance novels than Jane Austen and most have been best-sellers. His work has also been very successful when turned into movies, which is more than a lot of other romance authors, male or female, could say.
I would like to see more disabled characters in fantasy literature as this is not really something that is common as far as I know. Characters with disabilities are very popular in science fiction, but I'm not a big fan of how their disabilities are usually just "cured" with technology. Lost a limb? Here, have a cybernetic one. Lost an eye? Here, have a cybernetic one. I mean I get the whole cyberpunk element and it is cool and everything, but in science fiction, it often just feels like disabilities are treated like a small bump in the road instead of the insurmountable obstacle it is for many people.

I would have thought that losing a limb is a much greater threat and more likely in fantasy where everyone is always swinging around big axes or swords. Game of Thrones handles it well with Jamie Lanister who loses a hand and has to cope with going from one of the greatest swordsmen in the realm, to struggling and relearning everything he once mastered. I would love to read a story about say an archer who has to cope with the loss of an arm that makes it impossible for him to continue fighting or a warrior that is used to fighting with a two handed sword or sword and shield combo who has to adjust to fighting with only one arm. All too often in fantasy fiction the hero has a "disability' that somehow turns out to be a gift in disguise, which is not how these things work in reality!
I have a feeling that in a hundred years (or even less) readers will look back at answers to questions such as this and wonder how anyone could ever have felt unsettled by stories that are so tame in comparison to what is available in their time. Just compare the sex and violence in recent books to the kind of stuff that shocked the public a hundred years ago to see what I mean. There's no way that 50 Shades of Gray would have been an international bestseller back then! But I digress, to answer your question, here is my list of unsettling books (in no particular order.)

-Suffer the Children by Craig DiLouie = Don't read this if you are a parent.
-Horns: A Novel by Joe Hill = Forget the motion picture, the book is the real deal and written by Stephen King's son.
-Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk = Is throwing up the same as feel unsettled? If so, this book definitely unsettled me.