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Cast A Long Shadow (The Big Sky Series Book 1)
By Kwen D. Griffeth
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$4.99
Ruthless Game: A Captivating Police Detective Thriller
By Danielle Girard
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$5.99
Temptation Isla: A murder mystery full of twists from the author of Tormenta Isla (Isla Mujeres Mystery Book 4)
By Lynda L. Lock
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Cast A Long Shadow
By Kwen D. Griffeth
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Overdose (Ash Suspense Thrillers with a Dash of Romance Book 3)
By Uvi Poznansky
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Temptation Isla
By Lynda L. Lock
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Ruthless Game
By Danielle Girard
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The Heritage
By Jack Michonik
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Overdose
By Uvi Poznansky
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Undergrowth
By Ellen King Rice
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Knight Rising
By Jason Hamilton
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All Hearts Come Home for Christmas
By Annalisa Russo
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The Secrets of the Saved Brides
By Chloe Carley
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$1.99

Recently Answered Questions

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Bit of a tricky question to answer because what constitutes as "real" depression? I've certainly felt sad after reading a few books, but I can't really call it depression. It was more like a sense of loss because I knew that my time with the characters were over and I wasn't quite prepared for it. This happens a lot with longer books or a series where it is easy to get attached to the characters and then you have this void when it's all over and done with. Usually it doesn't last too long as the best remedy is to pick up another book and get cracking with that one until the cycle repeats. I suppose the closest that a novel has ever gotten to making me feel depressed is The Bell Jar. It was written by Sylvia Plath and it's about a women who attempts to commit suicide after becoming depressed. The book hit me hard and it was even more of a punch to the gut when I discovered that Sylvia commited suicide herself just after the novel was published. I suppose that the story was a way for her to try and wrestle with her own inner demons and it saddens me deeply that she lost the battle.
Men who misrepresent their gender for commercial gain is despicable in my honest opinion. Just like we should not tolerate cultural appropriation, why must we tolerate men who are purposefully misleading their readers who are thinking that they are supporting a woman? It is a very slippery slope and I think a lot of male authors have stepped far over the line of what is right and wrong. I mean, where does it end? If it is acceptable for a man to pretend he is a woman when writing, why not misrepresent his ethnicity or heritage as well to exploit these for commercial gain. Historically, women has had to use pseudonyms just to get their work published or for readers to take them seriously, so I think that the men doing that now is making a mockery of the sacrifices and hard work women had to put in. Support real female authors and not the men trying to appropriate our gender for their own gain.
This is an easy answer; any book written by a woman before the turn of the century was ahead of its time. Just the fact that women had the bravery and determination to put pen to paper in a society where men were calling all the shots and oppressing them shows how far ahead of their time they were. I don’t think it would be a stretch to say that without these brave women who risked everything to tell their stories, literature as we know it today would not have existed. If you are looking for specific examples, how about Maya Angelou, one of the greatest African American memoir writers of her time. Or how about Mary Shelley, the woman who at the tender age of eighteen practically invented the whole science fiction genre with her book, Frankenstein? The list goes on and on with names like Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, Harper Lee, and many others. For the past few years now I have challenged myself to only purchase and read books written by women and it has been a great experience. One of my favorite discoveries has been The Book of the City of Ladies and The Treasure of the City of Ladies, both written by Christine de Pizan, an author who was far ahead of her time.
Although you specifically ask for novels, I would also recommend that you take a look at a few actor/actress biographies if you want a "real" look at what goes on behind the scenes in the film industry. Some of the stuff is really shocking and eye-opening. If you purely want something fictional about the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, then you shouldn't have any trouble tracking interesting stuff as it is practically a genre on its own. My favorites are;

American Dream Machine (2014). This novel is by Matthew Specktor, who is not only a novelist but also a screenwriter, so he knows a thing or two about Hollywood. Hid dad is also a talent agent for the top agency in film, Creative Artists Agency. With clients like Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, Daniel Craig, Tom Cruise, Robert De Niro, Johnny Depp, and Robert Downey Jr., this agency is pretty unbeatable in the business. In this book, Matthew writes about two talent agents who start from nothing and go on to practically shape the industry before going to war with each other.

Get Shorty (1990). This novel is by Elmore Leonard, although most people only know the 1995 movie or the recent television series based on it. If you've watched either of those, there's not much more to say about Get Shorty apart from the fact that it is hilarious. If you have not watched the film or series, then you'll still love the book.
If you want to read books from different cultural perspectives, it would make sense to seek out foreign authors. In case you need somewhere to get started, here are what I suggest:

1. The White Tiger (Aravind Adiga - 2008). Aravind Adiga is an Indian author and The White Tiger is his debut novel. The premise of the book focuses around a man named Balram Halwai who manages to escape a life of poverty in India. As a very successful businessman he explains how he went from being a servant as a young boy to the "entrepreneur" that he as become. If you have ever been curious about the social castes in India, then this critical analysis by Adiga will be an eye-opener.

2. Mornings In Jenin (Susan Abulhawa - 2006) Mornings in Jenin is something that you don't see very often, a book about Palestine that is set after 1948. Fear and poverty play large roles in this book, not surprising considering the setting, but the author also manages to weave a captivating tale throughout. This story is set in a world that I think very few of us can truly imagine and while it can be hard to read depending on your political stance, I think it is a very powerful and very thought provoking story that deserves to be read.

3. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich ( Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn 1963) This is an old book, but a very good one. What makes it unique is that the entire novel takes place in just a single day and the protagonist is just an ordinary person. So far that doesn't sound all that interesting, but it is the setting that makes all the difference. You see, the book takes place in the 1950s and the protagonist, Ivan, is a prisoner in a Soviet labor camp. The conditions are harrowing and the primary focus of all the prisoners is simply that of survival. Chillingly, the author had firsthand experience in the Gulag system after criticizing Stalin.