Se-quo-yah, from Harper's New Monthly, vol 41

Se-quo-yah, from Harper's New Monthly, vol 41

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Se-quo-yah, from Harper's New Monthly, vol 41 by Unknown

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1870

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Se-quo-yah, from Harper's New Monthly, vol 41

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Book Excerpt

petty exactions. It was a mere question of confiscation, or robbery, without redress, by the Indians. He risked it. With traders, at that time, it was customary to take an Indian wife. She was expected to furnish the eatables, as well as cook them. By the law of many Indian tribes property and the control of the family go with the mother. The husband never belongs to the same family connection, rarely to the same community or town even, and often not even to the tribe. He is a sort of barnacle, taken in on his wife's account. To the adventurer, like a trader, this adoption gave a sort of legal status or protection. Gist either understood this before he started on his enterprise, or learned it very speedily after. Of the Cherokee tongue he knew positively nothing. He had a smattering of very broken English. Somehow or other he managed to induce a Cherokee girl to become his wife.

This woman belonged to a family long respectable in the Cherokee Nation. It is customary for those ignorant of the Indian so

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J.D. Moyer - Colliding Worlds and Repopulation of a Wild Earth
FEATURED AUTHOR - J.D. Moyer lives in Oakland, California, with his wife, daughter, and mystery-breed dog. He writes science fiction, produces electronic music in two groups (Jondi & Spesh and Momu), runs a record label (Loöq Records), and blogs at jdmoyer.com. His previous occupations include dolphin cognition researcher, martial arts instructor, Renaissance Faire actor, dance music event promoter, and DJ. His short stories have appeared in several magazines and his novelette The Icelandic Cure won the 2016… Read more