La Grenadiere

La Grenadiere

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La Grenadiere by Honoré de Balzac

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La Grenadiere

By

2
(1 Review)
Translated By Ellen Marriage.

Book Excerpt

ong the vines; in short, not an inch of this precious soil is wasted. If by chance man overlooks some dry cranny in the rocks, Nature puts in a fig-tree, or sows wildflowers or strawberries in sheltered nooks among the stones.

Nowhere else in all the world will you find a human dwelling so humble and yet so imposing, so rich in fruit, and fragrant scents, and wide views of country. Here is a miniature Touraine in the heart of Touraine--all its flowers and fruits and all the characteristic beauty of the land are fully represented. Here are grapes of every district, figs and peaches and pears of every kind; melons are grown out of doors as easily as licorice plants, Spanish broom, Italian oleanders, and jessamines from the Azores. The Loire lies at your feet. You look down from the terrace upon the ever-changing river nearly two hundred feet below; and in the evening the breeze brings a fresh scent of the sea, with the fragrance of far-off flowers gathered upon its way. Some cloud wandering in space, changin

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This appears to be part of a larger work. It is heavily descriptive in the way that many 19th century novels were, and very little happens in it. The addendum states that the characters of the mother and two sons appear in other works by Balzac which, read together, might give the piece more significance.

The translation flows well, but if you are looking for a complete story, this might not be what you have in mind.