General Science

General Science

By

3
(1 Review)
General Science by Bertha May Clark

Published:

1912

Pages:

288

Downloads:

11,708

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General Science

By

3
(1 Review)

Book Excerpt

boiling water, and after cooling for a few minutes, it is placed in a vessel containing finely chopped ice (Fig. 10). The mercury column falls rapidly, but finally remains stationary, and at this level another scratch is made on the tube and the point is marked 32°. The space between these two points, which represent the temperatures of boiling water and of melting ice, is divided into 180 equal parts called degrees. The thermometer in use in the United States is marked in this way and is called the Fahrenheit thermometer after its designer. Before the degrees are etched on the thermometer the open end of the tube is sealed.

[Illustration: FIG. 9.--Determining one of the fixed points of a thermometer.]

The Centigrade thermometer, in use in foreign countries and in all scientific work, is similar to the Fahrenheit except that the fixed points are marked 100° and 0°, and the interval between the points is divided into 100 equal parts instead of into 180.

The boiling point of