The Trumpet-Major

The Trumpet-Major

By

0
(0 Reviews)
The Trumpet-Major by Thomas Hardy

Published:

1880

Pages:

322

Downloads:

1,958

Share This

The Trumpet-Major

By

0
(0 Reviews)
A soldier in the war with BuonaparteandRobert his brotherfirst mate in the merchant service.

Book Excerpt

of the soldiers then walked some distance onward together, when one stood still, the other advancing further, and stretching a white line of tape between them. Two more of the men marched to another outlying point, where they made marks in the ground. Thus they walked about and took distances, obviously according to some preconcerted scheme.

At the end of this systematic proceeding one solitary horseman--a commissioned officer, if his uniform could be judged rightly at that distance--rode up the down, went over the ground, looked at what the others had done, and seemed to think that it was good. And then the girl heard yet louder tramps and clankings, and she beheld rising from where the others had risen a whole column of cavalry in marching order. At a distance behind these came a cloud of dust enveloping more and more troops, their arms and accoutrements reflecting the sun through the haze in faint flashes, stars, and streaks of light. The whole body approached slowly towards the plateau at the top of the down.

Anne threw down her work, and letting her eyes remain on the nearing masses of cavalry, the worsteds getting entangled as they would, said, 'Mother, mother; come here! Here's such a fine sight! What does it mean? What can they be going to do up there?'

The mother thus invoked ran upstairs and came forward to the window. She was a woman of sanguine mouth and eye, unheroic manner, and pleasant general appearance; a little more tarnished as to surface, but not much worse in contour than the girl herself.

Widow Garland's thought

More books by Thomas Hardy

(view all)
Claire Duffy - Snarky Protagonists, Dark Facts Blended With Fiction, and Suspenseful Crime-solving
FEATURED AUTHOR - Claire Duffy was a screenwriter for over a decade until she caught herself cycling past a production company and giving it the finger. She decided she didn't like the person the film industry was turning her into. Duffy quit, took a temporary job at a daycare in Stockholm, and wrote her first novel while her class of one-year-olds took their afternoon nap. Through blogging that story in daily chapters, she discovered indie publishing and never looked back.