A Treatise on the Tactical Use of the Three Arms: Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry

A Treatise on the Tactical Use of the Three Arms: Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry

By

5
(1 Review)
A Treatise on the Tactical Use of the Three Arms: Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry by Francis J. Lippitt

Published:

1865

Pages:

81

Downloads:

950

Share This

A Treatise on the Tactical Use of the Three Arms: Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry

By

5
(1 Review)
Every complete military force consists of three arms,--Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry.In battle, these three arms are united; and, other things being equal, that commander will prove victorious who is best acquainted with their combined use in the field.In order thoroughly to understand the proper use of the three arms combined, we must obviously begin by learning the proper use of each of them separately.

Book Excerpt

him to be much too great; for in his last battle, at Waterloo, he posted his second line, both infantry and cavalry, at only sixty paces behind the first; thus sacrificing, to a great extent, the advantage of keeping the second line out of fire, in order to secure the more important one of concentration of force. But this was only his formation for defence; for, in the same battle, his formations for attack were always in close columns.

14. Our present Infantry Tactics have adopted two new expedients to accelerate the advance of battalions, and diminish the loss to which columns of attack are liable--Division Columns and Advancing by the Flank of Subdivisions.

As Division Columns break the battalion line into several columns, each of two or three subdivisions deep, as a substitute for a single column four or five subdivisions deep, they undoubtedly diminish the loss from the enemy's artillery fire in corresponding proportion. But in compensation for this partial advantage, they have th