The Autobiography of a Quack

The Autobiography of a Quack
and The Case of George Dedlow

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The Autobiography of a Quack by S. Weir Mitchell

Published:

1900

Pages:

70

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2,170

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The Autobiography of a Quack
and The Case of George Dedlow

By

0
(0 Reviews)

Book Excerpt

t, her ways of hiding her money proved useful, to me at least. As to Peninnah, she was nothing special until she suddenly bloomed out into a rather stout, pretty girl, took to ribbons, and liked what she called ``keeping company.'' She ran errands for every one, waited on my aunt, and thought I was a wonderful person--as indeed I was. I never could understand her fondness for helping everybody. A fellow has got himself to think about, and that is quite enough. I was told pretty often that I was the most selfish boy alive. But, then, I am an unusual person, and there are several names for things.

My father kept a small shop for the sale of legal stationery and the like, on Fifth street north of Chestnut. But his chief interest in life lay in the bell-ringing of Christ Church. He was leader, or No. 1, and the whole business was in the hands of a kind of guild which is nearly as old as the church. I used to hear more of it than I liked, because my father talked of nothing else. But I do not mean to bore m

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