A Lost Leader

A Lost Leader

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A Lost Leader by E. Phillips Oppenheim

Published:

1907

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A Lost Leader

By

3
(1 Review)
A realistic romance woven around a striking personality."Mr. Oppenheim almost persuades us into the belief that he has really been able to break down the wall of secrecy which always surrounds the construction of a Cabinet, and has decided to make an exposure on the lines of a well-known American writer. He also touches upon the evils of gambling in Society circles in a manner which should be applauded by Father Vaughan, and, in addition, treats us to a romance which is full of originality and interest from first to last."

Book Excerpt

l means!" he answered. "Our foursome stands, then, Mrs. Handsell. This way, Borrowdean!"

The two men turned once more seaward, walking in single file along the top of the grassy bank. The woman in the car inclined her head, and motioned the driver to proceed.

CHAPTER II

THE WOMAN WITH AN ALIAS

Borrowdean seemed after all to take but little interest in the game. He walked generally, some distance away from the players, on the top of the low bank of sandhills which fringed the sea. He was one of those men whom solitude never wearies, a weaver of carefully thought-out schemes, no single detail of which was ever left to chance or impulse. Such moments as these were valuable to him. He bared his head to the breeze, stopped to listen to the larks, watched the sea-gulls float low over the lapping waters, without paying the slightest attention to any one of them. The instinctive cunning which never deserted him led him without any conscious effort to assume a pleasur

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In this 1909 romance about English politics, a man named Mannering is called from his retired life in the country to return to politics as a conservative leader. He resists, and members of his party bring pressure to bear in unscrupulous ways, among them a beguiling duchess in incognito and a secret out of his past, the single less than honorable act of his life. Yet once in office, Mannering doesn't toe the party line, in part because his eyes become opened to the plight of the working class. Mannering is a little too good to be true, but much of the political chicanery seems realistic. As such, it's depressing reading in this election year. This is well written, but I prefer Oppenheim's action novels.