The Sleuth of St. James's Square

The Sleuth of St. James's Square

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4
(1 Review)
The Sleuth of St. James's Square by Melville Davisson Post

Published:

1920

Pages:

206

Downloads:

1,699

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The Sleuth of St. James's Square

By

4
(1 Review)
Slightly connected detective stories which are developed in a rather unusual way. The solutions are logical and less miraculous than those of Sherlock Holmes. Will not have the popular appeal of many other mystery stories, but will be liked by Post admirers.Contents: The thing on the hearth -- The reward -- The lost lady -- The cambered foot -- The man in the green hat -- The wrong sign -- The fortune teller -- The hole in the mahogany panel -- The end of the road -- The last adventure -- American horses -- The spread rails -- The pumpkin coach -- The yellow flower -- A satire of the sea -- The house by the loch.

Book Excerpt

ut putting down the glass.... His face was strange, Excellency.... Then he looked at me.

"'Put a log on the fire,' he said.

"I went in and added wood to the fire and came out.

"The Master remained in the doorway; he reentered when I came out, and closed the door behind him.... There was a long silence after that; them I heard the voice, permitted to the devocation thin, metallic, offering the barter to the Master. It began and ceased because the Master was on his feet and before the fireplace. I heard him swear again, and presently return to his place by the table."

The big Oriental lifted his face and looked out at the sweep of country before the window.

"The thing went on, Excellency, the voice offering its lure, and presenting it in brief flashes of materialization, and the Master endeavoring to seize and detain the visitations, which ceased instantly at his approach to the hearth."

The man paused.

"I knew the Master contended in vain against the thing; if h

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Very good mystery stories by one of the greatest American mystery writers. For some reason, this collection as readily available on the Internet is a free e-book, though I'm sure it is not the best or most well-remembered of the stories that Post wrote. Nevertheless, they are clever stories, cleverly told. These stories are loosely connected, and feature (in a manner of speaking) the detective Sir Henry Marquis. For example: some of them are stories told by Sir Henry. One of the many things that makes Post's writing stand out is the way he plays around with narrative structure. (It reminds me a bit of Joseph Conrad - but not quite that complicated.) These stories are good, but I'm sure there are better to be found. Post is most famous for the stories he wrote that feature "Uncle Abner."