New Word-Analysis

New Word-Analysis
Or, School Etymology of English Derivative Words

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New Word-Analysis by William Swinton

Published:

1879

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New Word-Analysis
Or, School Etymology of English Derivative Words

By

3
(1 Review)

Book Excerpt

n preceded by a consonant, is generally changed into i on the addition of a suffix.

EXCEPTION 1.--Before ing or ish, the final y is retained to prevent the doubling of the i: as, pity + ing = pitying.

EXCEPTION 2.--Words ending in ie and dropping the e, by Rule I. change the i into y to prevent the doubling of the i: as, die + ing = dying; lie + ing = lying.

EXCEPTION 3.--Final y is sometimes changed into e: as, duty + ous = duteous; beauty + ous = beauteous.

Rule IV.--Final "y" preceded by a Vowel.

Final y of a primitive word, when preceded by a vowel, should not be changed into an i before a suffix: as, joy + less = joyless.

Rule V.--Doubling.

Monosyllables and other words accented on the last syllable, when they end with a single consonant, preceded by a single vowel, or by a vowel after qu, double their fin

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