By Advice of Counsel

By Advice of Counsel
Being Adventures of the Celebrated Firm of Tutt & Tutt Attorneys & Counsellors at Law

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4
(2 Reviews)
By Advice of Counsel by Arthur Cheney Train

Published:

1921

Pages:

200

Downloads:

1,379

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By Advice of Counsel
Being Adventures of the Celebrated Firm of Tutt & Tutt Attorneys & Counsellors at Law

By

4
(2 Reviews)
Stories of the courts and trials of New York City, connected by the presence in each of the benevolent Mr. Tutt of Tutt and Tutt, attorneys and counsellors at law. Those who liked Tutt and Mr. Tutt will enjoy also the local color and amusing incidents of these.

Book Excerpt

false pretenses, tricks and devices, flimflams--practised most successfully by well-dressed gentlemanly crooks of polished manners."

By this time the kettle was boiling cheerfully, quite as if no such thing as criminal law existed at all, and Miss Wiggin began to make the tea.

"All the same," she ruminated, "people--particularly very poor people--are often driven to crime by necessity."

"It's Nature's first law," contributed Tutt brightly.

Mr. Tutt uttered a snort of disgust.

"It may be Nature's first law, but it's about the weakest defense a guilty man can offer. 'I couldn't help myself' has always been the excuse for helping oneself!"

"Rather good--that!" approved Miss Wiggin. "Can you do it again?"

"The victim of circumstances is inevitably one who has made a victim of someone else," blandly went on Mr. Tutt without hesitation.

"Ting-a-ling! Right on the bell!" she laughed.

"It's true!" he assured her seriously. "There are two defenses that ar

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Train presents another set of beautifully-crafted short stories of the law firm of Tutt and Tutt. There is more legal and moral debate in this set, but the humour and story twists are still there. This is excellent literature that works on so many levels.
This followup to "Tutt and Mr. Tutt" is amusing, but not up to the original -- mostly because of the long-winded legal descriptions and analyses included in almost every chapter. Although this information is presented in the form of conversations, they quickly become tedious, and you find yourself wishing the author would just get on with the story.