The Macdermots of Ballycloran

The Macdermots of Ballycloran

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The Macdermots of Ballycloran by Anthony Trollope

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1866

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The Macdermots of Ballycloran

By

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(0 Reviews)
The tragic episode of the betrayal of poor Feemy Macdermot, together with the vengeance of her brother on the villain, adds a note of poignant pathos to the story. Altogether it may be said that "The Macdermots of Ballycloran" fully justifies its [Irish] locale and its title, while its alternate humour and pathos more than compensate for the lack of technique in the writing. It is really quite a good story. --Algar Thorold, 1906

Book Excerpt

of the old Irish Princes was in her veins: her step, at any rate, was princely. Feemy, also, had large, bright brown eyes, and long, soft, shining dark hair, which was divided behind, and fell over her shoulders, or was tied with ribands; and she had a well-formed nose, as all coming of old families have; and a bright olive complexion, only the olive was a little too brown, the skin a little too coarse; and then Feemy's mouth was, oh! half an inch too long; but her teeth were white and good, and her chin was well turned and short, with a dimple on it large enough for any finger Venus might put there. In all, Feemy was a fine girl in the eyes of a man not too much accustomed to refinement. Her hands were too large and too red, but if Feemy got gloves sufficient to go to mass with, it was all she could do in that way; and though Feemy had as fine a leg as ever bore a pretty girl, she was never well shod,--her shoes were seldom clean, often slipshod, usually in holes; and her stockings--but no! I will not furth

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