The Development of Embroidery in America

The Development of Embroidery in America

By

0
(0 Reviews)
The Development of Embroidery in America by Candace Wheeler

Published:

1921

Pages:

0

Downloads:

438

Share This

The Development of Embroidery in America

By

0
(0 Reviews)

Book Excerpt

ed the work of native Indians. This, however, would be unfair to a primitive art, which accomplished, with perfect appropriateness to use and remarkable adaptation of circumstance and material, the ornamentation of personal apparel.

The porcupine quill embroidery of American Indian women is unique among the productions of primitive peoples, and some of the dresses, deerskin shirts, and moccasins with borders and flying designs in black, red, blue, and shining white quills, and edged with fringes hung with the teeth and claws of game, or with beautiful small shells, are as truly objects of art as are many things of the same decorative intent produced under the best conditions of civilization.

To create beauty with the very limited resources of skins, hair, teeth, and quills of animals, colored with the expressed juice of plants, was a problem very successfully solved by these dwellers in the wilderness, and the results were practically and æsthetically valuable.

In the Smithsonian In

Jeff Buick - Clever, Fast-Paced Thriller Featuring a Complex Series of Crimes
FEATURED AUTHOR - Jeff Buick writes fast-moving fiction across numerous genres, including mystery, suspense, thrillers and crime. For Jeff, it’s all about the story. Nothing works without a great story relentlessly driving the action ahead. A tight plot with well-crafted characters means a psychological thriller geared for readers who love an adventure. Creating the characters who populate his books is second only to the plot line, and there’s no better place to find those characters than in the real world.… Read more